One fine morning, the faithful lackey, who has hitherto identified completely with his master, leaps on his oppressor and slits his throat. RV

Tuesday, 16 November 2010

London - Tens of thousands of students from all over the country demonstrate anger at government plans. Tory headquarters in Millbank Tower stormed.


Wednesday 10th of November saw over 50,000 students march through the centre of London in opposition to the proposed raising of tuition fees to £9,000. The demo had been called by the National Union of Students (NUS) and the University and College lecturer’s Union. (UCU) The organisers were said to have been expecting around 12,000 people to take part but they under estimated the scale of opposition to this clearly classist policies which would make higher education only available to the richest in society. The 50,000+ crowd snaked its way through London stopping at 10 Downing Street to chant some abuse, then stopping by the parliament building and then proceeding past Millbank tower which houses the Conservative Party’s campaigning office. Once the march was passing the Millbank tower a bloc of anti-capitalist students splintered from the main march towards the reception area of the tower and forced their way in and opened the doors to the rest of the protestor many of whom looked sheepishly at each other for a minute but eventually began to flood in with ever increasing confidence. Once the example had been set thousands began to enter and spread until the whole courtyard was occupied and people began to enter and smash the offices, occupying the building and the roof tops.
The corporate media, the government and even the National Union of student’s president were quick to blame the actions on a “small rogue minority” of “socialists and anarchists who led the nice middle class kids astray, despite the participation of an estimated 5000+. (Around 10% of the march) The “despicable ,“ “mindless,” “hardcore” mob “hell bent on destruction and chaos” was mostly made of school, college and university students many of whom professed to this being their first political protest. This action was bigger than just the issue of tuition fees; it was a manifestation of years of years of undemocratic rule, unequal opportunity and frankly a refusal to accept a system that most people clearly see as rotten and working against them.

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